Museum

Museum

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It’s not everyday that students can snap photo booth pictures of themselves during their class break.

From Nov. 4 through Feb. 1, two prominent New York City art museums, the Frick Collection and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will contemporaneously showcase the artwork by the renowned Spanish artist of the 17th century: El Greco.

This fall, Fordham College at Lincoln Center (FCLC) has its eyes on many of New York’s new art exhibitions, as museums go out-with-the-old and in-with-the-new. Displays range from El Greco’s Spanish Renaissance paintings to contemporary fashion staples.

This summer, three classes of Fordham students are studying abroad in Rome. After a brief hiatus, the classes will be held for the sixth year. Students of all Fordham campuses, grade levels and Italian mastery are taking advantage of this summer experience in a cultural city.

Beginning fall 2014, students will have the option of picking from three Introduction to Art History courses at Fordham College at Lincoln Center (FCLC) and Fordham College at Rose Hill (FCRH). Each of these three courses will cover three different regions of the world: Europe, the Americas and Asia.

It is easy to learn about the culture of a different country in New York City, but it is by visiting the country itself, and walking the streets of a foreign city we’ve never visited before, that we get a real understanding of the culture in question.

From Sunday, March 16 to Monday, April 14, students at Fordham College at Lincoln Center (FCLC) will display and continue Pedro Reyes’ ongoing project “Palas por Pistolas” in the Ildiko Butler Gallery.

On Thursday, March 13, the Neue Galerie, a museum dedicated to early 20th German and Austrian art and design, will present “Degenerate Art: The Attack on Modern Art in Nazi Germany, 1937,” the first exhibition brought to the United States, on what in Nazi Germany was considered “degenerate art.”

It is the first time that an exhibition this complete on futurism, knoqn as “Italian Futurism, 1909-1944: Reconstructing the Universe,” has been displayed in the United States. With about 400 pieces by 80 artists, this exhibit, which opened at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum on Feb. 21, has already achieved global success.

Audiences tend to judge a film by its director and actors, but more often then not, those who give a film life—the set designers—go unrecognized.